Legislation 

PPE legislation is neccesarily complicated and detailed. To help guide you through the legislation, we have created a dedicated legislation section to address any queries you might have and an e-book.

Anchor Safety has more than 20 years' experience in PPE, and we are always happy to help, so if you have a question, please do contact us on 0800 328 5028.

EN 374

EN 374 Chemical Resistance Standards Compliance IconEN 374 Micro-Organism Standards Compliance IconEN 374 Penetration Standards Compliance Icon

EN 374 is the European standard for gloves giving protection from chemicals and micro-organisms. The information given under EN 374 allows you to select the right glove for your needs as it indicates the length of time the glove will offer protection from a particular chemical.

EN 374 tests Penetration and Permeation:

Penetration is the movement of a chemical, and/or micro-organism through the glove.

Permeation is the breakthrough time or the time taken for the hazardous liquid to come into contact with the skin.

Each chemical tested is classified in terms of breakthrough time (performance level 0 to 6) with Class 6 representing the highest breakthrough time.

Within EN 374, there are 3 pictograms that are used:


EN 374 Penetration Standards Compliance Icon

 A glove which is "chemically resistant" will display this pictogram. The pictogram must be accompanied by a 3 digit code. This code refers to the code letters of 3 chemicals (from a standard list of 12) for which a breakthrough time of at least 30 minutes must have been obtained.

EN 374 Chemical Resistance Standards Compliance Icon

 This pictogram  will be used for the "low chemical resistant" or "waterproof" glove. These have not achieved the "chemical resistant" test but have complied with the penetration test.


EN 374 Micro-Organism Standards Compliance Icon

 This pictogram  will be used when the glove conforms to at least performance level 2 for the penetration test.

EN 388

EN 388 Standards compliance icon

EN 388 is the European Standard for protective gloves for mechanical risks. 

The symbol is followed by four numbers which indicate how the glove has performed in test conditions. This allows you to choose the right glove based on the hazards you encounter in your industry. The higher the number = the higher the resistance.

The four tests are:

Abrasion - this indicates the number of cycles required to abrade through the glove. A performance index of 0-4 is used.

Blade Cut - this indicates the number of cycles to required to cut through the glove. A performance index of 0-5 is used. Please note that these gloves should not be used when working with a serrated blade.

Tear - this demonstrates the tear resistance of the glove. A performance index of 0-4 is used.

Puncture - this demonstrates the amount of force required to pierce the glove with a standard puncture needle. A performance index of 0-4 is used.

EN 420

EN 420 Standards Compliance Icon

All gloves must comply with the EN 420 General Requirements for Gloves.

As EN 420 is the basic standard, it is often not displayed but all gloves must have this standard. Electrical insulating and medical disposable gloves are the only exemptions.

The pictogram represents the instructions for use that must be enclosed with every glove. The instructions need to contain information about storage and transport, cleaning, handling and disposal. EN 420 also includes tests for glove dimensions, dexterity and allergens.

Full details of these tests can be found in the HSE EUROPEAN STANDARDS AND MARKINGS FOR HAND AND ARM PROTECTION 

EN 407

EN 407 Standards Compliance Icon

EN 407 is the European standard used for gloves giving protection against thermal risks.

The symbol is followed by a series of six numbers. These numbers indicate how the glove has performed against the below tests. A performance index of 0-4 is used with the higher the rating, the higher the resistance of the glove.

The six tests include:

Burning Behaviour - indicates the period a material keeps on burning or glowing after the removal of the flame from the test specimen. The seams of the protective glove must not dissolve after a burning period of 15 seconds.

Contact Heat - measures the heat passing through to the inside of the glove, which cannot rise more than 10°C in 15 seconds.

A performance level for the below tests is only shown if Level 3 or 4 for burning behaviour is achieved.

Convective Heat - shows the period a protective glove can delay the heat transmission of a flame. 

Radiant Heat - measures the time taken for the temperature inside the glove to rise 24°C when exposed to radiant heat density of 20kw/ m2. 

Resistance to Small Drops of Molten Metal - indicates the number of splashes of liquid metal required to heat the inner side of the glove by 40°C. 

Resistance to large quantities of Molten Metal - indicates the amount of liquid metal required to breach a PVC foil (which simulates the human skin) that is clamped behind the protective glove.




EN 1149

EN 1149 Standards Compliance Icon

EN1149 indicates the antistatic properties of a garment.

EN 1149 is a garment norm and was not conceived especially for glovesor helmets, although it is used for both. Therefore, before the antistatic garment is used, the working conditions must be correctly described and be compared with the performance of antistatic protective garment.

The standards used are:

EN 1149-1 - Surface resistance - for materials that are not surface conductive.

EN 1149-2 - Contact resistance.

EN 1149-3 - Discharge - all materials that are not surface conductive.

EN 1149-4 - Garment test - no concept is available yet.

EN 61340

EN 6134 Standards Compliance Icon

EN 61340 indicates the discharge capacity (electrostatic discharges) of the gloves. This standard confirms the basic requirements for materials which come in contact with or damage component parts that are sensitive to electrostatic discharges (ESD). These requirements include protective clothing along with protective gloves.

This indicates that the gloves have met the following requirements:

1. Discharge test by measurement of the voltage of a charge condenser cage over the worn glove of the earth tester from U = 1000V to U(t) = 100V in T< = 2 seconds.

2. Resistance requirements; worn gloves. Resistance to a grounding point Rg7.5x105<=Rg<=1x1012.

EN 60903

EN 60903 Standards Compliance Icon

EN 60903 is used for gloves that protect against electric shock. 

To choose the right glove for your specific needs, you need to know what voltage level can occur.

To obtain compliance with EN60903, all gloves are tested to the relevant voltage. The construction, thickness and test voltage combine to give the class compliance which ranges from 00 to 4, with 4 offering the highest level of protection.

It is important that to maintain class compliance, gloves must be inspected and/or re-tested every six months.

EN511

EN 511 Standards Compliance Icon


EN 511 is the European standard that indicates the protection against cold given by your gloves. 

This is followed by three numbers which show performance in three tests:

  • Convective cold which is climatic or industrial cold transmitted through convection. This is rated on a Performance Index of 0-4 to 4 with 4 being the highest resistance.

  • Contact cold is climatic or industrial cold transmitted through contact. This is rated on a Performance Index of 0-4 to 4 with 4 being the highest resistance.

  • Water impermeability is tested in accordance with EN 344:1992. Water penetration should not appear less than 30 minutes after the start of the test and essentially is a pass or fail and is given a performance of 0-1.

EN ISO 20346

ISO EN 20346 replaces EN 346.  This standard indicates that the safety footwear has toecaps which have been tested to 100 joules.

The standard will have one of the following categories listed which will give more information on the level of the protection that the boots give:
  • PB Protective basic, 100 joules protection.

  • P1 As PB plus anti-static properties and energy absorption of closed heel region.

  • P2 As P1 plus water penetration resistance.

  • P3 As P2 plus penetration resistance and cleated outer sole.

The safety footwear may aso offer additional safety features, which will be indicated by the display of any of the following codes:

  • P Penetration resistance offered by a midsole.

  • E Energy absorption of heel region. A Anti-static footwear.

  • HI Insulation against heat.

  • CI Insulation against cold.

  • WRU Water penetration and absorption resistance.

  • HRO Resistance to hot contact up to 300°C.

EN ISO 20345

EN ISO 20345 replaces EN 345. This standard indicates that the safety footwear has toecaps which have been tested to 200 joules.

The standard will have one of the following categories listed which will give more information on the level of the protection that the boots give:

  • SB Up to 200 joules protection.

  • S1  As SB plus anti-static properties and energy absorption of closed heel region.

  • S2  As S1 plus water penetration resistance.

  • S3  As S2 plus penetration resistance and cleated outer sole.

  • S4  All rubber or all polymeric footwear with anti-static properties and energy absorption of closed heel region.

  • S5  As S4 plus penetration resistance and cleated outer sole.

EN 13287

What is EN 13287?

EN 13287 is the test method for slip resistance.The testing is conducted in laboratory conditions, but the suitability of the footwear will depend on your working environment.

The following three Slip Ratings can be given:

  • SRA - covers footwear tested on ceramic tile floor with sodium lauryl solution. The coefficient friction requirement for the forward heel slip has to be no less than 0.28 and the forward flat slip not less than 0.32.

  • SRB - covers footwear tested on steel floor with glycerol flat slip. The coefficient friction requirement for the forward heel slip has to be no less than 0.13 and the forward flat slip not less than 0.18.

  • SRC - confirms that the footwear conforms to both of the above tests.

PPE standards for protecting the eyes and face

EN 166 is the core technical standard to which all PPE involved in protecting the eyes or face must be approved. Within the standard, there are numerous levels of further compliance, depending on the end use of the piece of equipment in question. These standards will be marked on the protection.

The standards include:

EN 169 - Filters for welding and related techniques.

EN 170 - Ultraviolet filters. 

EN 171 - Infrared filters. 

EN 172 - Sunglare filters for industrial use. 

Discover more detail in our e-book , including what the standards test and how to understand the EN product markings, 

EN 166

EN 166 is the core technical standard to which all PPE involved in protecting the eyes or face must be approved. Within the standard, there are numerous levels of further compliance, depending on the end use of the piece of equipment in question. These standards will be marked on the protection.

Read our e-book to discover what each standard covers and how to understand the EN product markings.

EN 169

EN 169 is the eye & face protection standard that covers filters for welding and related techniques. This standard specifies the scale numbers and transmittance requirements for filters intended to protect operators performing work involving welding, braze-welding, arc gouging and plasma jet cutting.


EN 170

EN 170 is the eye & face protection standard that relates to utraviolet filters. 

This standard specifies the scale numbers and transmittance requirements for lters for protection against ultraviolet radiation. The protective filters specified in this standard are not suitable for the direct or indirect observation of an electric arc. For this purpose a welding filter appropriate to the source being observed should be used. Such a filter would not have a scale number less than 6.

Full details of the EN product markings can be found in our e-book.

EN 171

EN 171 is the standard that applies to Infrared filters. This standard specifies the scale numbers and transmittance requirements for filters for protection against infrared radiation. The protective filters specified in this standard are not suitable for the direct or indirect observation of an electric arc. For this purpose a welding filter appropriate to the source being observed should be used.

EN 172

Sunglare filters for industrial use. This European Standard specifies the scale numbers, transmittances and related requirements for sunglare filters for industrial use. This standard does not apply to filters for protection against radiation from artificial light sources such as those used in solaria. EN 170 applies for these filters.

Read our e-book for full details of the EN product markings.

EN-352-1

This section of the standard covers headband earmuffs and establishes requirements in terms of manufacture, design and performance, test methods, instructions relating to marking and information intended for users.It stipulates putting at disposal the information relating to earmuffs acoustic fading characteristics, measured in conformity with EN 24869-1 and therefore specify a minimal fading level necessary to establish their conformity with the present specification.

This section of the standard does not deal with earmuffs designed to be fixed on a helmet or to be a part of a helmet or with the performance of electronic devices likely to be inserted in the earmuffs, or even with amplitude sensitive earmuffs. This standard does not deal with ear protection performance as far as impulse noise is concerned.

EN-352-2

This part of the EN 352 standard specifies constructional, design and performance requirements, marking requirements and user information for ear-plugs. It calls for the sound attenuation of the ear-plugs, measured in accordance with EN 24869-1, to be declared and to be not less than a specified minimum.

EN-352-3

This part of the EN 352 standard specifies requirements for construction, design, performance, marking and user information for helmet - mounted earmuffs. In particular, it calls for the sound attenuation of the earmuffs, measured in accordance with EN 24869-1, to be declared and to be not less than a specified minimum.           

The requirements of the EN 352 standard are intended to take account of the ergonomic interaction between the wearer, the device and where possible the working environment in which the device is likely to be used.

PPE standards for Hearing Protection

The Noise at Work Regulations require employers to assess noise levels and provide appropriate remedies and/or ear protection. When choosing protection, to avoid potential hearing damage and maximise comfort, it is essential to select the correct hearing protection for your work activity and environment. Different options are available, including earplugs and earmuffs and these are covered by seperate European standards, full details of which can be found in our e-book.


EN 352

The Noise at Work Regulations require employers to assess noise levels and provide appropriate remedies and/or  ear protection. When choosing protection, to avoid potential hearing damage and maximise comfort, it is essential to select the correct hearing protection for your work activity and environment. EN 352 is the standard for hearing protection.

It is seperated into 3 categories for different types of protection:

EN 352-1 for headband earmuffs.

EN 352-2 for ear-plugs.

EN 352-3 for helmet mounted earmuffs.

PPE standards for Head Protection

Head protection requirements are covered by The PPE at Work Regulations 1992 and The Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989, which are intended to reduce head injuries on construction sites.

European standards; EN 397 and EN 812, detail the standards to which safety helmets and bump caps must conform to. Full details of these standard can be found in our e-book.

There are also specialist standards which cover:

- EN 1149 - Antistatic properties.

- EN 1073-2 - Protective clothing against radioactive contamination.

- ICE/EN 61482- Protective clothing against the thermal hazards of an electirc arc.

EN 397

EN 397 covers the standards required for industrial safety helmets and includes four areas of testing:


- Impact/shock absorption
- Penetration
- Design requirements
- Retention system
Requirements of each area of testing:

IMPACT / SHOCK ABSORPTION

Where helmets are of the type intended to protect a static user from predominantly falling hazards, a series of impact tests are carried out using a fixed headform, with a falling mass striker. For a helmet to meet the requirements of EN 397, the maximum transmitted force, after suitable signal conditioning, cannot exceed 5kN. This is carried out on helmets pre-conditioned to high temperature, low temperature, water immersion and UV ageing.

PENETRATION                       

Industrial helmets are tested to ensure they offer sufficient protection against sharp or pointed objects. The test is based on a striker dropped from a set height onto the helmet fitted to a fixed headform. The striker is a pointed cone (of mass 3kg, dropped from a height of 1 metre) and the assessment is based on whether the striker makes contact with the headform underneath the helmet. This is carried out on helmets preconditioned to high temperature, low temperature, water immersion and UV ageing.

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS                   

Most specifications for protective helmets include a number of requirements for the design of a helmet in addition to the specific performance requirements. These typically encompass the area of coverage provided by the helmet, as well as the field of vision afforded to the user when worn. They can also cover a number of ergonomics and safety-based requirements, such as clearance between the head and the shell of the helmet (particularly in the case of industrial helmets).

RETENTION SYSTEM

The specific test carried out is dependent on the type of helmet, but two main tests are carried out:

Retention system strength: The retention system is subjected to a force to ensure the strap is unlikely to fail at the point where it is most necessary. To avoid strangulation hazard straps need to include a break-away element at the anchorages, intended to fail within a specific load range.                   

Retention system effectiveness: Helmets are subjected to a shock load, in an attempt to pull the helmet off the headform. In order to meet the requirements of most protective helmet standards, the helmet must remain on the headform.

               

EN 812

EN 812 is the standard for industrial bump caps. It tests impact/shock absoprtion and penetration. 

IMPACT / SHOCK ABSORPTION

Bump caps are intended only to protect the wearer from static objects (e.g. walking into low ceilings or hanging obstructions). Impact tests are carried using a lower energy level – a 5kg at striker is dropped onto the bump cap from a height of 250 mm, with a maximum allowable transmitted force of 15kN. This is carried out on bump caps pre-conditioned to high temperature, low temperature, water immersion and UV ageing.

                       

PENETRATION

Bump caps are intended to provide protection against sharp or pointed objects (such as corners or protruding elements of static objects), and so a penetration test is required. The test is based on a striker dropped from a set height onto the bump cap fitted to a fixed headform. The striker is a pointed cone and the assessment is based on whether the striker makes contact with the headform underneath the bump cap. The penetration test is carried out at a lower energy (500g striker dropped from 500mm) to reflect the nature of the hazards. This is carried out on bump caps pre-conditioned to high temperature, low temperature, water immersion and UV ageing.

When is a Fall Arrest system required?

When collective protective systems are not feasible on a work site, a personal fall arrest system is required. This equipment is designed to secure a person to an anchorage point in such away that a fall from height is either totally prevented or safely arrested. Whilst a worker will hopefully never have a fall, the equipment should be comfortable enough for all day wear. The components of a Personal Fall Arrest System are explained below. Individually these components will not provide protection from a fall. Used properly in conjunction with each other, however, they form a Personal Fall Arrest System that becomes vitally important to the safety on the site and the overall fall protection programme.   

Components of a Personal Fall Arrest System:                       

ANCHORAGE POINT & CONNECTOR                   

Anchorage Point: Commonly referred to as a secure tie-o point (e.g. a girder, sca olding, lifeline). The anchorage point:                               

  • must have a static resistance >10kN during 3 minutes (EN 795b).           

  • should be located high enough to avoid contact with a lower level should the worker fall and be as vertical as possible to the working place.

  • Anchorage Connector: Used to join the intermediate attachment to the anchorage point (e.g. webbing strap, steel sling, girder grip) should be adapted to the anchorage point and have a minimum static resistance of 15kN for 3 minutes (EN 362).                               

BODY WEAR                               

Full Body Harness: The personal protective worn by the worker.           

  • Its role is to hold the worker if a fall occurs, so that the worker will not be injured nor slip out of the harness.   

  • The safest form of body wear for use in fall arrest applications is the full body harness. Belts can be used for work positioning and restraint applications.           

  • It should be selected based on the work to be performed and the work environment.           

  • Each anchorage point on the harness should have a static resistance >15kN for 3 minutes (EN 361 and EN 358).

                               

CONNECTING DEVICE                               

  • Intermediate Attachment: This is the critical link that joins the harness to the anchorage point or connector (e.g. shock absorbing lanyard, fall limiters and self retracting lifelines, rope grab).           

  • Its role is to limit the free fall of the worker and should be selected based on the work to be performed and the work environment.                   

  • The potential fall distance must be calculated to determine the type of intermediate attachment to be used.

When is a Work Positioning System required?

When access is not feasible by traditional methods (platform, mewp, etc) a worker may be required to use technical height access equipment. In this case, the Fall Protection Equipment goes beyond a basic fall arrest system: it becomes the essential equipment required by the worker to carry out the job in a secure, hands-free position at height. Components of a Work Positioning System:                   

ANCHORAGE POINT & CONNECTOR

Anchorage Point: A secure tie-off point (e.g. permanent fall arrest systems, horizontal lifelines, etc). Anchorage Connector: Used to join the intermediate attachment to the anchorage point.

                       

BODY WEAR

Full Body Harness: may be a sit in harness with padded leg straps or seat for work in suspension or full body harness with padded waist belt for a supported hands-free work position.                   

• It should allow full freedom of movement and protect the worker if a fall occurs, so that the worker will not be injured nor slip out of the harness.                   

• It should be selected based on the work to be performed and the work environment.

                       

CONNECTING DEVICE

C0 Intermediate Attachment: This is the critical link that joins the harness to the anchorage point or connector (e.g. lanyard, fall limiters, rope grab etc).                       

• Its role is to limit the free fall of the worker and should be selected based on the work to be performed and the work environment.

C2 Work Positioning System: This is the unit used to hold a worker in a secure, hands-free working position (e.g. work positioning lanyard, locking descender).                   

• In a rescue situation, this device may need to support the weight of two people.

                       

EN 12841/C

This standard covers rope access systems - back-up devices.

EN 341

This standard covers Descenders

EN 354

This standard covers Lanyards.

Connection elements or equipment component. A lanyard can be in rope made of synthetic fibers, in metallic rope, in strap or in chain. Maximum length : 2m.

Caution: A lanyard without energy dissipating element must not be used as a fall arrest equipment.

                       

EN 358

This standard covers work positioning systems.

A work positioning system consists of components (work positioning belt and lanyard) linked to one another to form a complete equipment.

EN 360

This standard covers retractable type fall arresters.

Fall arrester with self locking device and a self-retractable system for the lanyard. An energy dissipating element can be built-in to the equipment.

EN 361

This standard covers full body harness.

Body gripping device intended to stop falls. The full body harness can be made of straps, buckles and other elements, set and adjusted in a right way on the body of an individual to hold him back during a fall and afterwards.

EN 362

This standard covers connectors.

Connection element or equipment component. A connector can be a karabiner or a hook.

EN 363

This standard covers fall arrest systems.

Set of personal protective equipment against falls from a height, linked to one another and intended to stop a fall. A fall arrest equipment must contain at least a full body harness and a fall arrest device.

EN 795(b)

This standard covers anchorage devices - Class B.

An anchor device with one or more stationary anchor points without the need for structural anchor(s) or fixing element(s) to fix it to the structure, e.g. a webbing sling.

EN 813

This standard covers sit harness.

Harnesses (or additional attachments on a full body harness) intended for use where free-fall is not used – in particular, work positioning/restraint and for use in abseiling or rope access.

PPE standards for Fall Protection

Legislation states that all businesses are required to make proper provision for the planning and organisation of those working at height. The “zero tolerance” standard applies to all industry sectors and work activities where there is a risk of falling from height and personal injury.

The legislation is necessarily detailed and can be difficult to understand. Our e-book explains the basics of fall protection, how to calculate fall factors and the European standards that govern fall protection equipment.

How do I calculate the fall factor?

Understanding the fall factor for a particular situation allows you to act to reduce the risks and decide which type of fall system is most appropriate to protect your workforce. Details and worked examples can be found in our e-book.

EN 13034

EN 13034 is the Europen standard that applies to protective clothing against liquid chemicals.

EN 13034 covers the lowest level of chemical protection against a potential exposure to small quantities of spray or accidental low volume splashes of less hazardous chemicals against which a complete liquid permeation barrier (at a molecular level) is not required. Type 6 suits protect at least the trunk and Type PB(6) provides partial body protection.


EN ISO 11611

EN ISO 11611 Standards Compliance Icon

EN ISO 11611  this is used for protective clothing that offers protection against heat & flame.

EN ISO 11612

EN ISO 11612 is the European Standard that applies to protective clothing for use in welding & other allied processes.

EN 342

EN 342 is the European protective standard that applies to protection against cold (below -5oC)


EN 13982

EN 13982 is the European standard that applies to protective clothing for use against solid particulates Type 5. Full details of the standard can be found in our ebook.


EN 14605

EN 14605 Standards Compliance Icon

EN 14605  is the European standard that applies to protective clothing against liquid splashes. Full details of the standard can be found in our e-book.


EN 943-2

EN 943-2 Standards Compliance Icon

EN 943-2 applies to protective clothing against liquid & gaseous chemicals, including liquid aerosols & solid particles. Full details of the standard can be found in our e-book.


EN 14126

EN 14126 is the European Standard that applies to protective clothing against infective agents. Full details of the standard can be found in our ebook.

EN ISO 20471:2013

EN ISO 20471 Standards Compliance Icon

The requirements for High Visibility Clothing are covered by EN ISO 20471:2013 which is applicable for high-risk situations. EN ISO 20471:2013 details the following requirements:

- Design, including which part of the body should be covered and how wide the tape and bands must be.

- Background material, including the colours, colourfastness and, mechanical and physiological performance requirements.

- Requirements for retroreflective materials and their performance

- Making and care labelling

EN 343

Indicates level of protection against foul weather: rain, wind & cold (up to -5oC).

                       

x: Waterproofness (highest level 3).

y: Breathing properties (highest level 3).

EN 381

Mechanical Standards, covers protective clothing against chainsaw injuries.

                       

EN381 complies with protective clothing for chainsaw users. Within the standard, there are several parameters used. The norm also prescribes 4 classes that correspond to the chain speed with which the tests have been done. Not all the classes are authorised in each part of the norm.

                       

• Class 0: 16 m/s • Class 1: 20 m/s • Class 2: 24 m/s • Class 3: 28 m/s

               

EN 381-5 - Specifies the demands for leg protection wear and defines three types (or designs) according to the kind of protection. Types A & B are mainly intended for forestry work and professional lumber jacks who have trained & informed, and; Type C is intended to be used by people who normally don’t work with chainsaws.

                       

EN 381-7 - Specifies requirements for chainsaw gloves, describing two designs, A 7 B.

                       

EN 381-9 - Details requirements for chainsaw protective gaiters.

                       

EN 381-11 - Specifies requirements for the upper part of the body.

EN 393 50N   

This specifies that the buoyancy aid should have a buoyancy of no less than 50 Newton for the average adult, and is intended for use in sheltered waters and when help is close at hand and the user is a conscious, competent swimmer.

EN 395 100N

This specifies that the life jacket should have a buoyancy of no less than 100 Newton for the average adult and is intended for use offshore or when foul weather clothing is used.

EN 396 150N

This specifies that the life jacket should have a buoyancy of no less than 150 Newton for the average adult and is intended for use offshore or when foul weather clothing is used.

EN 399 275N

This specifies that the buoyancy of the lifejacket should be no less than 275 Newton for the average adult and is intended for use off shore in extreme conditions, when heavy protective clothing is used, or loads such as tool belts are being carried.

EN ISO 20471:2013

This harmonized standard has replaced the former standard EN 471:2004+A1:2007. The standard specifies the requirements for high visibility clothing “which is capable of visually signalling the user’s presence”. The new standard has broadened the usage base and a distinction between different types of risk situations has been made.

The definied risk situations will be the basis for which norm is applicable for the user. ISO EN 20471 is applicable to high-risk situations. On public highways you must wear garments with two bands and two braces of retroreflective material to standard, class 2 or 3. Conforming jackets with sleeves, in accordance with EN471, must be worn on dual carriageway roads with a speed limit of 50mph or above.

If the maximum number of cleaning cycles is stated in the manufacturer’s instructions it shall be related to the component of the high visibility material with the lowest number of washes. The maximum number of washes shall be marked on the garment’s permanent label near the graphical symbol above. If such an indication is not given,  certification has been granted on testing after 5 washes only. Drying must occur after each washing cycle.

                       

Manufacturers instructions

                       

It is the manufacturer who is responsible for informing the expected lifetime and limitations of the product. All garments must be marked according to the manufacturer's’ instructions. A defined explanation to the meaning of the maximum number of cleaning cycles provided with the garment (essentially stating that cleaning is not the only factor related to the lifetime of the product) must now be included in the information supplied by the manufacturer.

                       

GO-RT 3279 APPROVED GARMENTS FOR RAIL WORKERS.

                       

Document mandates minimum requirement for hi-visibility clothing for workers on the track or on the lineside.

Classifications of Negative Pressure Respirators

Negative Pressure Respirators are the most common type of air- purifying respirators, and as the name suggests, the air pressure inside the worker’s mask is less than the air pressure outside the mask. The safety risk present is that, if the seal between the worker’s face and mask is not tight, harmful substances in the air will leak into the mask without first passing through the filters.

Read our e-book to discover the standards that are used for Negative Pressure Respirators. 

Classifications of Power Assisted Devices

Powered Assisted Devices are positive pressure respirators. The basic concept is that the devices offer a pump that pulls in and filters air before it is pumped into the helmet or facepiece. Different models are available to allow you to tailor your respiratory solution to meet your requirements and help to achieve maximum user acceptance.

The standards governing the Powered Assisted Devices can be found in the e-book.


Classification of Compressed Air Devices

The European standards are seperated into those for Compressed Air-Line and Self Compressed devices. To see the standards in detail, access our e-book

Requirements for fitting and maintaining respiratory protective devices

According to the British Safety Industry Federation, research indicates that up to 50 per cent of all RPE used doesn't offer the wearer the level of protection assumed, often because it isn't fitted correctly.

COSHH (The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations) and the Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) have set regulations for the mandatory testing and fitting of respiratory protective equipment (RPE). Face fit test kits and training are available from Anchor Safety to help assist with compliance.



EN 149

This standard applies to filtering half-masks (single use) for protection against particulates. There are three protection classes: FFP1, FFP2 and FFP3.


EN 405

EN 405 is the European standard for filtering half-masks with valves for protection against gases or against gases and particulates.

EN 140

EN 140 is the standard for half and quarter masks, reusable, for use with filters and respiratory protection devices (SCBA with compressed supplied air, assisted ventilation, etc).


EN 136

This is the European standard for full-face masks, for use with filters and respiratory devices (SCBA and compressed air-line devices, powered assisted devices, etc).


EN 148

This is the European standard for face pieces connector threading requirements. This standard describes the different types of PPE connections and respirator filters. The most commonly used is standard EN148-1, which defines RD40 x 1/7" threading.


EN 143

Particulate filters for negative pressure respiratory devices.They are effective against dust and fibres, and most types of smoke, liquid aerosols and bacteria. Suitable for half-masks in compliance with EN140 or full-face masks EN136. There are three classes:

• P1: Low efficiency.

• P2: Medium efficiency.

• P3: High efficiency.


EN 141 or EN 14387

Gas/vapour filters and combined filters for respiratory devices with negative pressure. They are or classified according to their type and class. There are three classes that EN 14387 correspond to a difference in the filter capacity and a maximum concentration of the toxic substance authorised in the polluted air.

The three classifications are: • Class 1: 0.1% • Class 2: 0.5% • Class 3: 1%.


EN 12941 (e.g. EN 146)

This standard applies to powered assisted filtering devices incorporating helmets or hoods against particulates, gases and vapours. There are three classes for all the equipment: TH1, TH2, TH3.The particulate filtering cartridges are marked: TH1P, TH2P, TH3P.


EN 12942 (e.g. EN 147)

This standard applies to continuous flow compressed air-line breathing apparatus. Four light duty categories: 1A, 2A, 3A, 4A, four heavy duty categories: 1B, 2B, 3B, 4B.


EN 1835

A light-duty construction compressed air-line breathing apparatus incorporating a hood or a helmet. Three protection levels: LDH1, LDH2, LDH3.


EN 12419

This standard applies to light-duty construction compressed air-line breathing apparatus incorporating a full-face, half or quarter mask. Three protection levels: LDM1, LDM2, LDM3.


EN 270

This is the European standard for compressed air-line apparatus with hoods. A single level of protection is required and a warning for a low ow must be provided. EN 139 Compressed air-line apparatus with full-face masks, half-masks or mouthpiece assembly.


EN 137

This standard applies to self-contained open-circuit compressed air breathing apparatus.

EN 145

This standard applies to self-contained close-circuit breathing apparatus compressed oxygen or compressed oxygen-nitrogen type.


EN 1146

This standard applies to self-contained open-circuit compressed air breathing apparatus incorporating hoods.


EN 402

Self-contained open-circuit compressed.